Web Content Articles – The Science and the Art

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For the skeptical, let me put it this way … there should be science and art behind every web content article. Only then will each article rise above the mediocrity of the oh so many discussed, rewritten and churned out every day by the many sitting hunched over their computers in a state of daze, with the sword of deadlines hanging over them. Science and art, you say? How incompatible is that? And yet, you need a perfect melding of the two in order to dish out an article that floats above the rest.

First, the research. Make sure you copy-paste relevant matter from at least 8 sites. Read, absorb, consider, then drag your cursor over what you want, copy and paste. Once you've done that, continue in a scientific, methodical way to arrange the matter in a logical flow. Now, go through it and pick out only the portions that you feel will go into the article and do a further copying and pasting. This should roughly be double the number of words your article is going to be. Read through … you should feel you've got the skeleton of the article.

Enough of the science, the art begins. Write a great introduction. Just three sentences should do. Then rewrite the matter that you've put in order. You could have just one paragraph or many, it depends on the length of the article and the number of different thoughts processes it contains. The, sign off with a flourish. A good conclusion is one that sums up everything or one that just adds that little extra bit of dash and spice. In case you are writing an SEO article, try and weave in the keywords so they do not stand out like sore thumbs!

There, that's your article or rather the first draft. There's some way to go yet. Now read through the article very carefully. Does it flow? If it does not, try using simpler words instead of complicated ones. Then check for soul. Will it talk to the reader or is it a cold piece of work? Try and react instinctively, not logically. Infuse it with a bit of life.

Then comes the science bit again. Put it through a copy checker program. Make sure there's no room for any plagiarism problems. Run it through a keyword density program so you can include a percentage along with your article. Then give it a final read-through for spelling, grammar and construction.

All that should have taken you thirty minutes, except you're hopeless at typing. Sometimes, if the topics are tough, you might take quite a bit longer, but the average original article should normally not take more than half an hour. At the end of it, you should have an article no article spinning software could ever churn out! You'll have an article that rises up above the rest!